Library Storytelling Morning activity for February

Come to the “tellebration” with us! Monthly Saturday morning meetings where kids can enjoy selected stories in English with Brian George (Oliver) as storyteller.

Recommended for children between the ages of 4 – 9. Two adults per child maximum. Approx. 40 minutes.

Participation is free. Seating is limited; entrance is open until full capacity (35 kids per session). Register including children’s name/s and your favorite session (11 / 12:30 h.) and wait for our confirmation reply.

February 2010 storytelling around the book:

“Stone soup” by Jon J. Muth

Saturday February 27th

At 11 a.m. – English Version (All in English)

At 12:30 p.m – Bilingual Version (In English, using some Spanish to help understand)

“This rich story tells the story of Hok, Lok, and Siew–three monks traveling along a mountain road. The youngest monk, Hok (named after the Chinese deity symbolizing good fortune and prosperity), asks the question, “What makes one happy?”, and finds an answer in a little village filled with people who have lost faith and trust in each other. Villagers kept to themselves and would not greet the three traveling strangers. Siew, the older and wiser monk, decides it is time to make “stone soup”. This seemingly odd enterprise at first piques the villagers’ curiosity, and it isn’t long before the monks’ modest suggestions for additions to the soup (salt and pepper, carrots, and so forth) stimulate a whole village to share in the making of the soup, and enjoy a feast after the rich soup is made. And so it came to be that “as each person opened their heart to give, the next person gave even more”.”

From edutainingkids.com

Recommended links for parents and teachers:

http://www.tlpeace.org.au/stories/stonesoup.htm

http://www.marcias-lesson-links.com/stonesoup.html

Library Storytelling Morning activity for December

Come to the “tellebration” with us! Monthly Saturday morning meetings where kids can enjoy selected stories in English with Brian George (Oliver) as storyteller. Recommended for children between the ages of 4 – 8. Two adults per child maximum. Approx. 40 minutes.

Participation is free. Seating is limited, entrance is open until full capacity.

December storytelling around the book:

“White Snow, Bright Snow” by Alvin Tresselt & Roger Duvoisin

Saturday, December 19th 2009 at 12 p.m. (Noon)

“When the first flakes fell from the grey sky, the postman and the farmer and the policeman and his wife scurried about doing all the practical things grownups do when a snowstorm comes. But the children laughed and danced, and caught the lacy snowflakes on their tongues. All the wonder and delight a child feels in a snowfall is caught in the pages of this book — the frost ferns on the window sill, the snow man in the yard and the mystery and magic of a new white world. Roger Duvoisin’s pictures in soft blue half-tones with briliant splashes of yellow and red emphasize the gaiety and humor as well as the poetic quality of the text.”

From Harper Collins.

Recommended links for parents and teachers:

http://www.childrensliteraturenetwork.org/birthbios/brthpage/09sep/9-30tresselt.html

http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/353.html

http://familytlc.net/issues/january2007/books_4_1288.html

http://mrscjacksonsclass.com/wintersnow.htm

Library storytelling morning activity for November

Come to the “tellebration” with us! Monthly Saturday morning meetings where kids can enjoy selected stories in English with Brian George (Oliver) as storyteller. Recommended for children between the ages of 4 – 8.

Participation is free. Register at biblioteca@iie.es (sending kid’s name/s).

November storytelling around the book:

“Buffalo Woman” by Paul Goble

Saturday, November 28th 2009 at 12 p.m. (Noon)

Buffalo Woman

“A young hunter draws his bow against a buffalo cow drinking from a stream. Before he can loose his arrow, there is no buffalo — instead, there stands a beautiful young woman, whom he knows he must marry. The hunter’s people shun the Buffalo Woman, and so she returns, with their son, Calf Boy, to her people. The hunter’s heart compels him to follow. But he has been warned: The Buffalo Nation is angry at the Straight-up-People. And if he cannot find his wife and son among the many buffalo, they will be lost to him forever.”

From Barnes & Noble.

Recommended links for parents and teachers:

http://www.kstrom.net/isk/books/children/ch38.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Goble

http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/lessonplan.jsp?id=890